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  1. #11
    Senior Member superfish's Avatar
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    Looks like will need a big chiller in summer

  2. #12
    Premium member jayjerk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maidia View Post
    Hahaha
    they're all going to laugh at u

  3. #13
    Premium member jrpark22000's Avatar
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    Sheesh, how about back on topic

    I won't tell my wife but for the interest of this thread, I'm going through the linked site; http://www.coldwatermarineaquatics.com and updating the first post with lots of good info, as well as putting up some new posts.
    Visit Japan

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  5. #14
    Premium member jrpark22000's Avatar
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    A couple takeaways from all my reading and from the other thread in this new subsection, http://www.chicagoreefs.com/forums/s...Brookfield-Zoo

    Acrylic is the way to go. It has much better thermal insulation. Given that, thicker is better and 1" thick is a good goal to shoot for to prevent some of the problems, especially in our midwest climate.

    A chiller is a must. One thing to consider is with our tropical reefs, winter power outages are less common but results in tanks going cold. Summer outages are more common and would result in a cold reef melting down.

    Porous live rock is a must have in tropical, but in cold reefs, the bacteria act slower and live on the surface of rocks. You can't rely on lots of rock to achieve the same effect due to this dimensioned surface area of the inner rock. You MUST have great nutrient export equipment.

    Livestock suppliers are few and far between. With that, the livestock that is availbe is WYSIWYG, there just isn't an aquaculture ability. You'll be at the whim of what the collectors can obtain.

    As well as a chiller, you'll need to run either a room AC unit or whole house climate control. It'll help ease the load on your chiller, export the heat your chiller outputs, and prevent atmospheric problems like condensation.
    Visit Japan

  6. #15
    Premium member jrpark22000's Avatar
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    @AquaticEngineer One other takeaway from my reading is the lack of biological help in the nitrogen cycle in coldwater reefs. One of the success stories in tropical reefs is the use of K1 moving bed media to provide an optimal bacteria home. I've validated the results with two of my own setups, it very effectively provides a home for the waste to ammonia and ammonia to nitrite cycles. It doesn't help reduce nitrates, but WC help here.

    A question, it’s far reaching and I understand it’s too broad to answer effectively. How sensitive is the majority of coldwater animals to nitrate? Can you run a higher nutrient system and get away with it long term?
    Visit Japan

  7. #16
    Premium member jrpark22000's Avatar
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    After some more digging, these couple tanks includign one featured on reefbuilders answers more of my questions. They are stocked by @AquaticEngineer

    Pico Reefs are very possible.

    The chiller probes can keep picos at 55 deg.

    You can put fish into a temperate pico.

    Jim's tank;
    http://reefbuilders.com/2013/04/11/jims-temperate-pico/
    http://www.nano-reef.com/topic/31501...emperate-pico/

    Another reef, not sure how long it lasted;
    http://www.nano-reef.com/topic/32300...emperate-tank/

    One more major take away, quoting Micro-reefs "WHEREAS PATIENCE IS KEY IN TROPICAL REEFING .... PATIENCE IS MANDATORY IN COLD WATER REEFING...."
    Visit Japan

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  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty View Post
    I may consider doing one one day, especially since I'm already "semi" doing one with the ponies. I could get seahorses that require colder waters. The biggest issue would be finding tank mates that won't hurt them. Looks like most cold water critters are anemones and crabs, which are both no-no's.
    There are a lot of starfish, snails, shrimp, and small fish that would fit well with seahorses

    Quote Originally Posted by jrpark22000 View Post
    @AquaticEngineer One other takeaway from my reading is the lack of biological help in the nitrogen cycle in coldwater reefs. One of the success stories in tropical reefs is the use of K1 moving bed media to provide an optimal bacteria home. I've validated the results with two of my own setups, it very effectively provides a home for the waste to ammonia and ammonia to nitrite cycles. It doesn't help reduce nitrates, but WC help here.

    A question, itís far reaching and I understand itís too broad to answer effectively. How sensitive is the majority of coldwater animals to nitrate? Can you run a higher nutrient system and get away with it long term?
    In general most coldwater tanks run regularly with high nutrient levels, vodka dosing has proved amazingly useful in reduction of nitrates in coldwater systems.

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